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TOPIC: Is Kratom Addicting?

Is Kratom Addicting? 3 years 3 months ago #1042

  • Denise B
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Most Kratom users are under the impression that Kratom, like anything else, is addicting. Addiction is not only based off of the product but the way it is treated and even the personality of the user. Kratom itself does not cause or lead to addiction. However, people who have addictive personalities may notice side effects of addiction and if Kratom is abused, or used to often, it can also lead to addiction. It is all in the hands of the user.

One way to avoid addiction is to switch between a couple of different strains a week so that your body does not become tolerant to the Kratom and end up needing more. Another good piece of advice is to take a break from Kratom at least once or twice a week to allow your body time to know what life is like without it. This way Kratom does not become a huge part of your life, but simply the boost in your day :-bd
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Is Kratom Addicting? 2 years 1 month ago #3288

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Depends on if you're talking about physical or psychological addiction. There's a diff and in regards to Kratom - I know the answer.
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Is Kratom Addicting? 2 years 1 month ago #3308

First and foremost, I want to say that I have never experienced the "euphoria" that others claim to have experienced. I think they're idea of euphoria is different than mine. I have felt pure, powerful euphoria, and I don't see ANY euphoria from this plant. I have seen people claim they're euphoric after they've taken the plant, but I don't see the pupil constriction, ego boost, etc. that is accompanied by the usual euphoria from street drugs and pharmaceuticals. This is not what this post is about, however I felt it was necessary to point this out before expanding upon the topic of addiction.

This is my educated opinion:

We must first define what addiction means, because we all have a different notion of what addiction is. For some, it is extreme, for others it's a lose definition (ie. being addicted to Pizza or Ice Cream). I find myself somewhere in the middle. I have a degree in psychology, and I feel it's important to point this out first, as it leads to my perception of what addiction is. I also have first hand experience with it, from my party days as a late teen and tween.

PHYSIOLOGICAL ADDICTION POTENTIAL AND ANALYSIS: My notion of addiction is something that causes physical withdrawal symptoms, like caffeine's notorious "super-migraines", or a weekend of binge drinking withdrawals, where there are panic attacks, sweats, shivers, feeling cold and hot simultaneously, vomiting, etc. Then there are opiate/opioid withdrawals, which can be profoundly painful and worse than death. And then there is the psychological addiction.

PSYCHOLOGICAL ADDICTION POTENTIAL AND ANALYSIS: My notion of being psychologically addicted to something involves cravings. Without this element, there cannot be any psychological addiction. I am psychologically addicted to food, because I have a very bad anxiety disorder. I also used to abuse pills in my younger years, I grew up and when I had a child and got married, I got my self together extremely fast. I was very lucky, most people can't do that. My will-to-power was stronger than the obsessive thoughts for drugs. That didn't mean I wasn't craving stuff though. It was real tough. I quit smoking before the baby, those cravings last to this day, and that's about 10 or more years (I smoked Cigars). I used to have cravings so bad for certain pills that it would use all of my energy. I would turn cold and shake, and it was so intense, that after the extreme cravings would subside, I barely had enough energy to function and would feel the need to sleep. The feeling was very strong, as it literally drained me. That is psychological addiction.

OVERALL ANALYSIS : Is Kratom addictive? Well...no, not really. Kratom can be mildly addictive according to some theories and hypotheses, but that is based upon the studies' operational definition; that is to say, what "addiction" is in this one study (out of hundreds), and not all theory in psychology is the same. Some is black and white, while others have a grey area. People can use these different studies to suit their own personal agenda. Technically, they're stating fact, but it can be misconstrued. It is important to look at the operational definition. The official scientific definition of what addiction is has changed many times by the way, and since Psychology is a "soft science" (in contrast to hard science, like math, biology or physics), it is always changing - psychology. If you come back here in six years, I can almost promise you that it will be different than what it is now. Kratom - I prefer to think of it as habit forming. I do not get any other physical withdrawals from it, other than extreme lethargy for one day. I do not mix strains, I do not alternate, and I use a lot of it. If I had to tally it up, I would have to say that I do not experience physical withdrawals, because claiming an addiction is not a black and white thing. Feeling very tired is nothing in my opinion. Caffeine withdrawals are 10 times as bad. The pain is enough that it makes me cry and scream, I cannot bear it. I get them very, very bad, probably much worse than other people. I also can attest that the withdrawals from alcohol, even after one day of moderate drinking (ie. hangover), is akin to not having Kratom and experiencing what some might consider a mild withdrawal. That is a perfect way of looking at it, except with no vomiting, vertigo, or any other side effects other than being sleepy all day.

I do get cravings however, the aroma of Kratom is nice, and without it, I've always been clinically depressed, all my life. That means it's severe depression, as in I can't care for my children, or be an attentive parent. In other words, I'm unproductive, I can't remember things. I'm not a good partner, and I'm not a good American either. I also have moderate to severe anxiety disorder and terrible ADHD. I have almost no symptoms with the use of this plant. How severe are the cravings? Not too bad, they're annoying, but they go away and they don't come back after a few days of not having the plant. There might be a slight nagging feeling once in a while, but on a scale of one to ten, I would give it a one.

Overall, is Kratom addictive? I would say that it is not addictive, nor is it close to being addictive. I find other legal things more addictive, like certain foods, Cigars, Dark craft beers, sex...porn. I find that it's a healthy habit.

I prefer to think of it as slightly habit forming, like Chocolate...

It's nothing I think the FDA or DEA would need to concern themselves with. If anything, I think it would help the DEA a lot, in helping keep people clean, and help Americans be more productive, thus leading to a stronger nation, with more wealth and a higher standard of living, including those in a low S.E.S.
I own and operate www.pharmacy-dropout.com We have the United States leading supply of bulk and retail Thunder God Vine. We also have Kratom, and other exotic botanicals. All of our Products are sold with no intent on use, and are not sold for consumption.
Last Edit: 2 years 1 month ago by Pharmacy Dropout. Reason: Refinement.
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Is Kratom Addicting? 2 years 1 month ago #3339

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Pharmacy Dropout wrote:
First and foremost, I want to say that I have never experienced the "euphoria" that others claim to have experienced. I think they're idea of euphoria is different than mine. I have felt pure, powerful euphoria, and I don't see ANY euphoria from this plant. I have seen people claim they're euphoric after they've taken the plant, but I don't see the pupil constriction, ego boost, etc. that is accompanied by the usual euphoria from street drugs and pharmaceuticals. This is not what this post is about, however I felt it was necessary to point this out before expanding upon the topic of addiction.

This is my educated opinion:

<strong>We must first define what addiction means</strong>, <em>because we all have a different notion of what addiction is</em>. For some, it is extreme, for others it's a lose definition (ie. being addicted to Pizza or Ice Cream). I find myself somewhere in the middle. I have a degree in psychology, and I feel it's important to point this out first, as it leads to my perception of what addiction is. I also have first hand experience with it, from my party days as a late teen and tween.

<strong>PHYSIOLOGICAL ADDICTION POTENTIAL AND ANALYSIS:</strong> My notion of addiction is something that causes physical withdrawal symptoms, like caffeine's notorious "super-migraines", or a weekend of binge drinking withdrawals, where there are panic attacks, sweats, shivers, feeling cold and hot simultaneously, vomiting, etc. Then there are opiate/opioid withdrawals, which can be profoundly painful and worse than death. And then there is the psychological addiction.

<strong> PSYCHOLOGICAL ADDICTION POTENTIAL AND ANALYSIS: </strong> My notion of being psychologically addicted to something <strong>involves cravings</strong>. Without this element, there cannot be any psychological addiction. I am psychologically addicted to food, because I have a very bad anxiety disorder. I also used to abuse pills in my younger years, I grew up and when I had a child and got married, I got my self together extremely fast. I was very lucky, most people can't do that. My will-to-power was stronger than the obsessive thoughts for drugs. That didn't mean I wasn't craving stuff though. It was <em>real </em>tough. I quit smoking before the baby, those cravings last to this day, and that's about 10 or more years (I smoked Cigars). I used to have cravings so bad for certain pills that it would use all of my energy. I would turn cold and shake, and it was so intense, that after the extreme cravings would subside, I barely had enough energy to function and would feel the need to sleep. The feeling was very strong, as it literally drained me. That is psychological addiction.

<strong>OVERALL ANALYSIS </strong>: Is Kratom addictive? Well...no, not really. Kratom can be mildly addictive according to some theories and hypotheses, but that is based upon the studies' operational definition; that is to say, what "addiction" is in this one study (out of hundreds), and not all theory in psychology is the same. Some is black and white, while others have a grey area. People can use these different studies to suit their own personal agenda. Technically, they're stating fact, but it can be misconstrued. It is important to look at the operational definition. The official scientific definition of what addiction is has changed many times by the way, and since Psychology is a "soft science" (in contrast to hard science, like math, biology or physics), it is always changing - psychology. If you come back here in six years, I can almost promise you that it will be different than what it is now. Kratom - I prefer to think of it as habit forming. I do not get any other physical withdrawals from it, other than extreme lethargy for one day. I do not mix strains, I do not alternate, and I use a lot of it. If I had to tally it up, I would have to say that I do not experience physical withdrawals, because claiming an addiction is not a black and white thing. Feeling very tired is nothing in my opinion. Caffeine withdrawals are 10 times as bad. The pain is enough that it makes me cry and scream, I cannot bear it. I get them very, very bad, probably much worse than other people. I also can attest that the withdrawals from alcohol, even after one day of moderate drinking (ie. hangover), is akin to not having Kratom and experiencing what some might consider a mild withdrawal. That is a perfect way of looking at it, except with no vomiting, vertigo, or any other side effects other than being sleepy all day.

I do get cravings however, the aroma of Kratom is nice, and without it, I've always been clinically depressed, all my life. That means it's severe depression, as in I can't care for my children, or be an attentive parent. In other words, I'm unproductive, I can't remember things. I'm not a good partner, and I'm not a good American either. I also have moderate to severe anxiety disorder and terrible ADHD. I have almost no symptoms with the use of this plant. How severe are the cravings? Not too bad, they're annoying, but they go away and they don't come back after a few days of not having the plant. There might be a slight nagging feeling once in a while, but on a scale of one to ten, I would give it a one.

Overall, is Kratom addictive? I would say that it is not addictive, nor is it close to being addictive. I find other legal things more addictive, like certain foods, Cigars, Dark craft beers, sex...porn. I find that it's a healthy habit.

I prefer to think of it as slightly habit forming, like Chocolate...

It's nothing I think the FDA or DEA would need to concern themselves with. If anything, I think it would help the DEA a lot, in helping keep people clean, and help Americans be more productive, thus leading to a stronger nation, with more wealth and a higher standard of living, including those in a low S.E.S.

As an addiction counselor.. I could not add any more information to what Jeff just said! :-bd

A+ Jeff! :-bd:-bd:x
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Is Kratom Addicting? 2 years 1 month ago #3437

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Just my two cents but I have an addictive personality and have not had a problem with kratom. The worst of it for me is not taking it for a few days and sneezing and fatigue, I still get things done. I am also an emotional eater and have been better with that since using kratom. There is a lot of great posts here and I am glad.

A lot of good people use kratom. Not having coffee is worse for me. I really appreciate the analogy of chocolate. @ pharmacy dropout. Thank you for all the info you can provide it is great and from another person who studied psychology anything can be addicting. It is just choosing what you feel safe using and or eating and the risks involved in those situations.
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Is Kratom Addicting? 2 years 1 month ago #3438

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In my opinion kratom is addicting. People should know this before using (though it only becomes addicting after habitual use IMO). However, we need to be intelligent about what this term means. Some people think that all because something is addicting means that it is bad. In reality, however, whether something is addicting and whether something is good/bad are separate issues (look at caffeine, which does an enormous amount of good by waking people up and increasing productivity). I think kratom has a low/moderate amount of psychological addiction and a low amount of physical addiction. The degree will vary by individual. I do think a small degree of regulation is needed to ensure consistency, to keep it out of hands of minors, and other reasons. It should also be studied to better understand long term affects and how we might be able to increase it's medicinal value. I know a rational discussion is difficult in our society but let's try people it's 2015.
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Is Kratom Addicting? 2 years 1 month ago #3442

Moderately addictive drugs are commonly thought of as drugs such as GHB, some Benzodiazpeans like Xanax, Valium, MDMA (Ecstasy), Hydrocodone (Vicodin), etc. Generally, these types of drugs are schedule three drugs if they can be bought at the pharmacy. The street drugs I've mentioned here...are in my opinion...just as bad and sometimes thought of as "moderately addictive" according to a few studies. I have seen prescriptions that claim this on the print outs too.

Lets not change the topic though, I'm simply using this as a frame of reference to help the reader find contrast, so that I may convey my message/argument clearly, not create a wild tangent.

I teach my children to stay away from drugs like that, and I tell them, on a regular basis, stories from my party days and social life, that includes people who are addicted to those drugs, or people I knew who quit, but used long enough that they're no longer the same person (in a bad way). This includes obesity, destroyed thyroid, cardiovascular issues, personality disorders and general changes in personality that leads to them being totally different people, usually this is for the worst, but not always (I'm one of those rare exceptions).

Another issue I'm dealing with, is having Marijuana being legalized in Oregon next month for recreational drug use. I've taught my children to stay away from the drug for recreational purposes, and I've explained in words they can understand, why I think they should. Now I've got to explain to them how it might be okay with moderation (because it will be available to them, and they must learn the importance of moderation), but that I would prefer they don't use it. It's a new world now, daddies gotta rethink the whole thing and get with the times.

Moderately to highly addictive are drugs such as Morphine, Heroin, Cocaine, Opium, Oxycodone/Oxycontin, Dilaudid, while these are generally considered having a high risk of developing addictions, it is important to point out that there is a line where the moderate and high meet, and this is where it meets, and that is why Kratom cannot be moderately addictive. In my opinion it's not addictive, but to play the devils advocate, but only halfway.

I do not believe that Kratom is generally considered as addictive as those drugs mentioned before hand, nor would I say it's one third to two thirds as addictive as Heroin and Cocaine, making it moderately addictive. That's a pretty powerful overstatement in my opinion.

While it is important to note that everyone reacts differently to both drugs and objects, things such as dirt, rocks, feces, couches, finger-nails, etc, some people may find it more or less habit forming. Claiming it's addictive carries an extremely powerful negative connotation in our society and I wouldn't chose that word. It's bad for the movement, unless of course you truly believe it causes addiction, in which case I would not temper the words if I were in your shoes. I would say it might be habit forming at the worst, but an addiction is an entire different can of worms. This is why it is important to define what addiction is first, before using the word, and I would use a quantitative way of explaining it so it's measurable to the reader.

I believe the word addiction needs to be redefined in America.

I do not think it's moderately addictive, or mildly addictive.

I believe it's habit forming at the worst, like Chocolate, your favorite food or caffeine.

I respect you and your opinion, but I strongly disagree with the word moderate. It seems pretty far out there man.
I own and operate www.pharmacy-dropout.com We have the United States leading supply of bulk and retail Thunder God Vine. We also have Kratom, and other exotic botanicals. All of our Products are sold with no intent on use, and are not sold for consumption.
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Is Kratom Addicting? 10 months 2 weeks ago #14326

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I know this is an old thread, but I thought I'd share my opinion on "addiction".

In short, if you distinguish between dependence and addiction, which are completely different things, and if you remove most connotations from the word "addiction" and treat it simply as any self-reinforcing behavior, then using Kratom may be considered addictive for certain people in certain contexts, but this isn't a necessarily a bad thing, nor does it mean Kratom takes over the body and removes voluntary choice.

Addiction is simply any self-reinforcing behavior. It becomes self-reinforcing when doing it feels subjectively better than not doing it. The effects the behavior has on a person's physiology, the social environment they are in, the cultural and legal context of the behavior, and other things, all figure into a person's subjective preference over doing the behavior or not doing it. Despite strong pressures, they retain the ability to choose the behavior or not.

Society punishing someone for using Kratom changes the factors which go into a person's preferences in choosing whether to use Kratom or not, and may even push some people into using it more than if it did not carry negative social/legal consequences, but it does nothing to improve happiness, either in the individual or in the society as a whole.
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Is Kratom Addicting? 10 months 2 weeks ago #14356

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I feel it could be addictive.

Soo many variations of that word and everyone's view.
I have personally know people addicted...from gum all the way to crack cocaine and kratom could fall somewhere between those two things.
Just my opinion
Do your research and make you own decision pro or con. Its not for everyone but the government should not be telling me so.. thats another topic.
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